Using Extended Cognitive Behavioral Treatment and Medication to Treat Dependent Smokers AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH Hall, S. M., Humfleet, G. L., Munoz, R. F., Reus, V. I., Prochaska, J. J., Robbins, J. A. 2011; 101 (12): 2349-2356

Abstract

We evaluated smoking-cessation efficacy of an extended course of sustained-release bupropion (bupropion SR) and cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT).Participants who smoked at least 10 cigarettes per day and who smoked within 30 minutes of arising (n = 406) completed a 12-week smoking-cessation treatment including group counseling, nicotine-replacement therapy, and bupropion SR. Participants were then randomly assigned to 1 of 5 conditions: (1) no further treatment, (2) active bupropion SR for 40 weeks, (3) placebo for 40 weeks, (4) active bupropion SR and 11 sessions of CBT for 40 weeks (A-CBT), or (5) placebo and 11 sessions of CBT for 40 weeks. Participants were assessed at baseline and at weeks 12, 24, 52, 64, and 104.A-CBT was not superior to the other 3 extended treatments. From weeks 12 through 104, all extended treatment conditions were superior to standard treatment. At weeks 64 and 104, the 2 CBT conditions produced significantly higher abstinence rates than did the other 3 conditions.Brief contact with providers can increase abstinence during treatment. CBT may increase long-term abstinence after extended treatment is terminated.

View details for DOI 10.2105/AJPH.2010.300084

View details for Web of Science ID 000297140900029

View details for PubMedID 21653904